Category Archives: Project Finishes

Snowfall {A finish}

I am excited to say that Snowfall, was released last month in Love Patchwork and Quilting. I love how this quilt turned out.

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The idea behind the design and quilt was discovered when looking at a wall divider in our local art museum (NCMA). The wall divider had this slight gradation of negative space. That idea and shapes lead to this diamond based quilt.

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I wanted to keep the design simplistic so you can focus on the change in shape size and the decrease in Negative space. This led also to the dark grey and white colors and use of solids.  The slant direction adds interest due to the two variant shapes that can be seen in the negative space.

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As this is a repetitive block design, it is perfect for chain piecing. You will need to find a way to speed up to get through this 12 x 12 block configuration (144 blocks).

The current quilting was done by Cathy Kirk @thequiltingcowgirl, a 3 in. grid in keeping with the minimalistic style. I do plan to add in some hand quilting to highlight some of the star patterns in the negative space.

Finally, the back adds a little bit of spice/interest. It is a pieced back made from left over great/yellow prints.

Details

Name : Snowfall
Design:
Design by myself
Fabric: Kona Cotton (White, Steel)
Binding: Kona Cotton and Carolyn Friedlander print
Dimensions:  60 x 60″
Quilted: Cathy Kirk, @thequiltingcowgirl  Straight Lines ~ 3 inches apart

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B is for Blue

While I have been somewhat absent from my blog and Facebook the last month, it does not mean things have not been happening over here. One of the projects I had the pleasure to work on was “B is for Blue” quilt and write-up a pattern for Curated Quilts Minimalistic Edition.

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Photo Credit: Curated Quilts

I love minimalism and have been inspired by the works of Josef Albers, Ellsworth Kelly, Donald Judd and Carmen Herrera. Minimalism is not as easy as folks think. Yes, making the quilts are quick but designing requires a lot of editing and eliminating elements, and quilting needs to be added to complement the minimal aspects as well.

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For “B is for Blue” I was inspired by a photo I had taken of an old typeset shop. They had these typeset furnishings to store the blocks. As I played with the inspiration elements, I saw the core outlines of the shelving units and the gaps between them. Through eliminating some of the lines from the shelves and the blocks this is the design I came up with.

The color palette for this quilt was a challenge for me as these blues are just not my usual combination. I usually go for a navy or a bright darker blue. Living in Cary NC, it feels very University of NC inspired while I prefer the blue of Duke University. It was fun to see how the palette worked together.

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Quilting was added, currently just the vertical lines at approximately 1.5 to 2″ width but I plan to add some horizontal lines to the quilt as well. These lines will pull out the idea of a typeset tray.

Lastly, I used a Tula Pink light blue stripe print from the Elizabeth line. I felt that the stripe broke up the blue and added interest to the quilt.

Details

Name : B is for Blue
Design:
Design by myself
Fabric: Kona Cotton (Torch, Stratosphere, Sky, Prairie Sky)
Binding: Tula Pink, Elizabeth, Tent Stripe in Sky
Dimensions:  60 x 60″
Quilted: Straight Lines ~ 2 inches apart (domestic sewing machine)

If you are interested in submitting work and participating in curated quilts, take a look at their submission guidelines page. They have a great mini quilt challenge each quarter that you can take part in.

 

 

Triangles All Round {a finish}

A couple of weeks ago now was the Modern Quilt Guild’s QuiltCon. This year, I decided to participate in the MQG Mini Quilt Swap (#MQGSwap). I decided to use a WiP to make it easier. As you may know, I leave everything to the last-minute so starting with a finished top I thought would be more likely that I would complete it on time.

This top consists of nested triangles. I used all Alison Glass fabrics. A mix of Alison Glass text print, and blue Handcrafted fabrics.

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I really wanted to try something new with this mini, so right up front I wanted to try faced binding. This is the tutorial I used. It was easy enough but I would fine tune the corners and work out how to finish these a little better.

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I quilted it using my walking foot for straight lines. I created a focal point using the tip of the triangle as the pointer. For interest, I varied the widths. Also,  I stitched in the ditch for the actual Handcrafted triangle, keeping with the minimalistic look.

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I managed to finish it up in the Carolyn Friedlander lecture, 10 minutes before swapping. Nothing like finishing at the last-minute, though I was able to capture a quick pic outside the convention center.

Park Lamps {a finish}

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Photo Credit: Love Patchwork & Quilting #56

Park Lamps was one of my last finishes of 2017. I had a lot of fun with this quilt. Firstly, interpreting the original inspiration of old gas lamps at the Mannheimer Wasserturm in Germany. The gas lamp was used as one of the quilt design a day prompts (sparks) and included the original color palette. I loved the geometry of the triangles in the light.

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My interpretation of this spark, lead to this original Art Deco looking design.
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I was thinking about adding this design to my book but decided that it would be a better fit for a magazine submission. I submitted it to LPQ, and provided options for multiple color palettes to modernize the look of the quilt. This was fun playing with color. I really loved the final color palette (Kona Mint, Kiwi, Peach, Ice Peach and White – purchased from Stash Fabrics) and design (slightly simplified and re-scaled).

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I decided for accuracy, I would (foundation) paper piece this pattern. It involved a lot of repetitive but simple paper piecing. I loved how each of the blocks matched, as it was essential to the secondary design. For the quilting, I wanted to continue to highlight the secondary diamond shape the triangles made, so I used straight lines echoing that shape. I am very pleased with the finish.

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Photo Credit: Love Patchwork & Quilting #56

Details

Name (Original): Park Lamps
Name (LPQ): Fruit Punch
Design:
Design by myself
Fabric: Kona Cotton (Mint, Kiwi, White, Peach, Ice Peach)
Backing: Carolyn Friedlander wideback – green
Binding: Lecien striped fabric
Dimensions:  60 x 60″
Quilted: Echoed Straight Lines (domestic sewing machine)

 

Quilted Postcards {Tutorial}

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In my previous post, I shared my current experiment with quilted postcards. I make a finished 4 x 6″ standard sized postcard. Here is the list of materials and the instructions which start after you have a finished 4 1/2 x 6 1/2″ postcard front.

Materials

  • One (1) 4 1/2″ x 6 1/2″ pieced front
  • One (1) 4 1/2 ” x 6 1/2″ backing fabric
  • One (1) 4 x 6″ Fusible Fleece (like Pellon 987F) or
    Two (2) 4 x 6″ SF101 Pellon ShapeFlex
  • Thread for piecing/quilting
  • One (1) Adhesive Postcard back (purchased from Amazon.com)

Instructions

The postcards cannot be too thick otherwise you will not be able to use normal postcard postage so I use fusible fleece that is like a quilt sandwich or two pieces of Shape Flex interfacing (one on each side fused to the back and the top).

I have two ways of making my postcards. The first is not that different from a normal quilt, and can be seen in this image below. Take the postcard pieced top and baste to the fusible fleece, and then baste with a glue stick the bottom fabric to the fusible fleece. Quilt as desired, trim. Zig-zag or overlock the edge of the post card to finish.

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The second method, I chose since I was using bias tape and wanted to encapsulate the bias tape edges within the edge of the postcard. Here are the step by step instructions for this finish.

  1. Fuse the fusible fleece to the top of the pieced postcard top.fullsizeoutput_23fb
  2. Quilt the top with the fleece as desired and add the bias tape to the front.fullsizeoutput_23f9
  3. Place the top and back right sides together (RST). Stitch a 1/4″ seam around the postcard edge, leaving a two inch opening along one edge.fullsizeoutput_23f7
  4. Cut the corners inside the seam line, removing the bulk in corners. fullsizeoutput_23fc
  5. Turn the postcard inside out, using a chop stick or pencil end to push the corners out.
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  6. Press the postcard edges, to position the seams folds correctly. Top stitch the edge of the postcard. fullsizeoutput_23fe
  7.  To finish the postcard, take one of the adhesive postcard backs and place it on the back side of the fabric.
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The other size you can consider is a 5 x 7″ postcard and you will need to purchase the appropriate adhesive backs.

Let me know if you have any questions. If you make any postcards I would love to see them on Instagram – just tag me @ml_wilkie or use #quiltypostcards.

 

 

 

 

Quilted Postcards

I had a goal for September to make 30 postcards in 30 days (#30daysofpostcards) and have been sharing over on Instagram. Well, I will have 30 but it will take me more like 60 days. It has been the greatest experiment to play with 4 x 6″ quilts. I love it as I get these ideas all the time, and this size allows me to play but not invest too much time, to see if it works or not.

Right now, I am at 29 postcards. I am sending around 17 of them off, as postcards, to people who wanted to receive one. They in turn will send one postcard to someone else. I love the idea of sending a traditional note, a piece of mail, with a little quilty inspiration.

The first postcard that kicked it off was inspired by my effort in finding balance. The line representing balance and the quilting about finding the positives. I had to use my wonder women stamps in this pic., it seemed fitting.

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I have a couple of other book project ideas rolling around in my head. I experimented with both ideas and will likely move forward with these as book projects.

The first is a project based on the plastic construction fences.
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The second an improvisational triangle idea that is based on airplanes. ImprovTriangles_Postcard

With these next two postcard, I had vivid shapes pop into my head that I could not shake. The first being a Square with a cream border on one side, and one half made up of two triangles at various heights and dimensions. I played with the white and cream solids, stripes and black linen for interest.

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The second shape was split across 4 postcards, where each had a corner of a square. One of the corners was a 1/4 circle instead. In my head this 1/4 circle was also the opposite in color combination. I had not envisioned a color combination but decided when making it to do it in a navy and bright yellow. This is my favorite combination and will likely become a much larger quilt at some stage.
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For the longest time, I have admired Erin Wilson’s work (@erinwilsonquilts) who does amazing line work in her quilts. These last postcards were my study of lines. I still need to quilt these two.

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I have loved playing with this size that I think I might do another round, but this next one will be a cohesive collection vs. random experiments. I am thinking of playing with minimalism or just with lines in a specific color-way. The idea is still forming.

PS. If you are living in the US, I was very surprised with some of the great stamp collections the USPS (US Postal Service) has at the moment. I went a little crazy in purchasing a few, so I am thinking my son can now collect stamps ;-).

PPS. In a couple of days, I will post a tutorial so that you too can make your own quilted postcards. I am just finishing editing the photos.

 

Maker’s tote II {a finish}

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I finally have my own maker’s tote (a noodlehead pattern) and its the large version of it. You may remember a couple of months ago I shared some tips on making a maker’s tote. At that stage I had finished a small maker’s tote (which I gifted) and I was 3/4 through making this one.
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I have finally added the binding and the handles, which was all that was really left to finish. I added a bright pink binding to pull out the pink in the insects and natural Essex yarn-dyed linen handles that match the zipper covers (in the inside part of the bag).

The only additional  problem area I had while finishing this one up, was actually catching all the layers when I sewed in my gussets. I missed lining in some areas.  Next time, I think I may glue the lining to the edges of the top as well.  Luckily, I discovered this in time,  before stitching on the binding, so I could unpick and re-stitch areas while sewing on the binding.

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The bag is a success. I have already used my bag for a quick overnight business trip. I used it actually for my change of clothes and toiletries and it worked great!! I love my new bag, highly recommend it to anyone who wants to make one.